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St. Andrew in Krisei (Koca Mustafa Paşa Cami)

Author(s) : Arvaniti Smaragdi (6/30/2008)
Translation : Panou Eirini

For citation: Arvaniti Smaragdi, "St. Andrew in Krisei (Koca Mustafa Paşa Cami)",
Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World, Constantinople
URL: <http://www.ehw.gr/l.aspx?id=11786>

Μονή Αγίου Ανδρέα εν Κρίσει (Κότζα Μουσταφά Πασά Τζαμί) (9/7/2009 v.1) St. Andrew in Krisei (Koca Mustafa Paşa Cami) (9/7/2009 v.1) 

GLOSSARY

 

ambulatory (byz. arch.)
A continuous passage that envelops the naos or the centrally planned core of a structure. In a cross-domed church, where the dome is supported on four masonry piers and between each pair of piers two columns are inserted, the ambulatory is formed by the lateral aisles and western part of the church. Later on, an ambulatory could also envelop a cross-in-square core. During the Palaeologan period, ambulatories, usually serving as funerary chambers, were added to many middle-Byzantine churches of Constantinople.

apse
An arched srtucture or a semi-circular end of a wall. In byzantine architecture it means the semicircular, usually barrel-vaulted, niche at the east end of a basilica. The side aisles of a basilica may also end in an apse, but it is always in the central apse where the altar is placed. It was separated from the main church by a barrier, the templon, or the iconostasis. Its ground plan on the external side could be semicircular, rectangular or polygonal.

arsenitai
Followers and supporters of patriarch Arsenios Autoreianos, who had excommunicated Michael VIII Palaiologos. Michael managed to get rid of Arsenios in 1265; from that time, Arsenios’ followers were at odds with the Patriarchate of Constantinople, refusing to recognize Arsenios’ successors to the patriarchal throne. Politically they supported the Lascarid dynasty and opposed the dynasty of the Palaiologoi. The dispute was resolved in 1310.

barrel-vault
vaulted, semi-cylindrical construction used often as roof.

bema
The area at east end of the naos in Byzantine churches, containing the altar, also referred to as the presbetery or hierateion (sanctuary). In these area take place the Holy Eucharist.

cross- (groin-) vault
A vault formed over square or rectangular spaces by the interpenetration of two barrel-vaults of equal hight and diameter. The lines of the intersection form a diagonal cross.

cross-domed basilica
Type of domed basilica. A church plan, whose core, enveloped on three sides by aisles and galleries with a transept, forms a cross. The core is surmounted by a dome in the centre.

cross-in-square church
Type of church in which four barrel-vaulted bays form a greek cross; the central square of their intersection is domed. The cross is inscribed into the square ground plan by means of four corner bays.

diakonikon
An auxiliary chamber of the church, also known in early years as skeuophylakion, which could be a separate building attached to the church. There were kept the sacred vessels but sometimes also the offerings of the faithful, the archive or library. In Byzantine churches the diakonikon becomes the sacristy to the south of the Bema, corresponding to the prothesis to the north, and forming along with them the triple sanctuary. It usually has an apse projecting to the east.

dome
A characteristic element of Byzantine architecture. The dome is a hemispherical vault on a circular wall (drum) usually pierced by windows. The domed church emerges in the Early Byzantine years and its various types gradually prevail, while they are expanded in the Balkans and in Russia.

domical vault (byz. archit.)
A circular vault, like a shallow small dome without a drum, which is used to cover small compartments inside a building. It is often chosen for roofing the corner-bays of a Byzantine church.

donor's image
The representation of the church’s donors, usually depicted along with a holy figure. The representations are frequently accompanied by inscriptions mentioning the names of the donors.

drum of dome
Part of the church, semicircular or polygonal, on which rises an hemispheric dome

exonarthex (outer narthex)
The transverse vestibule or portico preceding the narthex of the church.

gynaikonites
Part of the church in the gallery, placed apart for women (gynaikes).

narthex
A portico or a rectangular entrance-hall, parallel with the west end of an early Christian basilica or church.

pendentive
Triangular surface used for the transition from the square base of the church to the hemispheric dome.

prothesis
Ιn ecclesiastical architecture, the sacristy to the north of the sanctuary. Usually it has an apse projecting to the east. It is the chamber where the eucharistic elements were prepared (Proskomide) before the Communion.

tympanum (lunette)
(Rom., Byz.) The arched panel (lunette) inside an arch or an arcosolium.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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